12 more supporters in the next hour

Tumblr friends and allies:

Today is Coastal Cleanup Day all up and down California’s coast. In San Francisco, I’ll be cleaning up Heron’s Head Park in the Bayview District.

Even if you can’t make it out today, you can still help through social media. My friend, who works for the Heal the Bay non-profit, is trying to get the word out about the effort…and he’s only got about 1 more hour to do it! If you have a minute, do me a HUGE favor and join Heal the Bay’s Thunderclap (a new platform that will tweet/post from all participating supporters’ accounts at the same time to make more of an impact on people’s social feeds). Even if you don’t live in California, it’s still worth getting the word out. Thunderclap won’t send out these tweets and posts unless they reach their goal of 250 supporters.
Get on it, folks! It will only take a minute of your time and you’ll be making a big impact on California’s coast :)
And PLEASE REBLOG IF YOU CAN. Thanks :)

Do me a favor…


Tumblr friends and allies:

Tomorrow is Coastal Cleanup Day all up and down California’s coast. In San Francisco, I’ll be cleaning up Heron’s Head Park in the Bayview District.

My friend, who works for the Heal the Bay non-profit, is trying to get the word out about the effort…and he’s only got about 19 more hours to do it. If you have a minute, do me a HUGE favor and join Heal the Bay’s  Thunderclap (a new platform that will tweet/post from all participating supporters’ accounts at the same time to make more of an impact on people’s social feeds). Even if you don’t live in California, it’s still worth getting the word out. Thunderclap won’t send out these tweets and posts unless they reach their goal of 250 supporters.

Get on it, folks! It will only take a minute of your time and you’ll be making a big impact on California’s coast.

And PLEASE REBLOG IF YOU CAN. Thanks

vicemag:

Reporting from Ferguson, the St. Louis Suburb That Has Become America’s Latest Racial Hotspot
Last night, I walked out of the Target in Ferguson, Missouri, to find my car behind police tape. Cops in riot gear were extending their security perimeter around West Florissant Avenue, where protests over the death of unarmed teenager Michael Brown turned into looting and riots Sunday night and clashes with police on Monday.
“You better hurry up and go get it,” a man in a group parked near me said. The cops let me retrieve my vehicle after a stern warning (complete with a rifle being waved around) to go left and not right when I reached the edge of the lot. Five minutes later I heard four tear gas canister volleys. Ten seconds after that a 20-something black man in a caravan of Ferguson residents came over.
“We going,” he said. “You coming?”
What followed was a raucous four-hour stretch marked by smoked out streets and rage. By midnight, West Florissant was littered with rocks, broken glass, spent tear gas canisters and pepper balls. As we approached the police line from the north, cops were flying everywhere and people were honking and and screaming. After hearing the canisters fly, people were angry enough to run stoplights, ignore cop cars and speed across town to make it to ground zero and figure out what was happening.
Brown, as you may have heard, was killed Saturday by a St. Louis County police officer. One protestor told me his death was the “spark that lit the fire,” one that’s been long smoldering in this St. Louis suburb, where relations between residents and police aren’t so hot. The details surrounding the 18-year-old’s death have been the subject of much contention, but whether Brown was shot between seven and ten times, as his cousin Sabrina Webb and many others claimed Monday, or whether it was less than that doesn’t really matter here. Nor does the fact that police maintain Brown struggled with the as-of-yet unnamed officer. What is gnawing at emotions and bubbling up at protests where many chanted “black power” Monday is the fact that Brown was unarmed and was apparently approached by the officer for jaywalking.
"They thought he was somebody else," Webb told me after pleading through a bullhorn that protestors not resort to the looting that resulted in damage to several businesses Sunday night. "It was racial profiling."
Continue

vicemag:

Reporting from Ferguson, the St. Louis Suburb That Has Become America’s Latest Racial Hotspot

Last night, I walked out of the Target in Ferguson, Missouri, to find my car behind police tape. Cops in riot gear were extending their security perimeter around West Florissant Avenue, where protests over the death of unarmed teenager Michael Brown turned into looting and riots Sunday night and clashes with police on Monday.

“You better hurry up and go get it,” a man in a group parked near me said. The cops let me retrieve my vehicle after a stern warning (complete with a rifle being waved around) to go left and not right when I reached the edge of the lot. Five minutes later I heard four tear gas canister volleys. Ten seconds after that a 20-something black man in a caravan of Ferguson residents came over.

“We going,” he said. “You coming?”

What followed was a raucous four-hour stretch marked by smoked out streets and rage. By midnight, West Florissant was littered with rocks, broken glass, spent tear gas canisters and pepper balls. As we approached the police line from the north, cops were flying everywhere and people were honking and and screaming. After hearing the canisters fly, people were angry enough to run stoplights, ignore cop cars and speed across town to make it to ground zero and figure out what was happening.

Brown, as you may have heard, was killed Saturday by a St. Louis County police officer. One protestor told me his death was the “spark that lit the fire,” one that’s been long smoldering in this St. Louis suburb, where relations between residents and police aren’t so hot. The details surrounding the 18-year-old’s death have been the subject of much contention, but whether Brown was shot between seven and ten times, as his cousin Sabrina Webb and many others claimed Monday, or whether it was less than that doesn’t really matter here. Nor does the fact that police maintain Brown struggled with the as-of-yet unnamed officer. What is gnawing at emotions and bubbling up at protests where many chanted “black power” Monday is the fact that Brown was unarmed and was apparently approached by the officer for jaywalking.

"They thought he was somebody else," Webb told me after pleading through a bullhorn that protestors not resort to the looting that resulted in damage to several businesses Sunday night. "It was racial profiling."

Continue

I’ve moved into a wind tunnel